Koine Greek: Ῥαμέσσης Rhaméssēs); born c. BC; died July or August ; reigned –), also known as Ramesses the Great, was the third pharaoh of the Nineteenth Dynasty .">

The life and times of ramses the great

See Article History Alternative Titles: Memphis is located south of the Nile River delta, on the west bank of the river, and about 15 miles 24 km south of modern Cairo. From north to south the main pyramid fields are: Foundation and Early Dynastic Period According to a commonly accepted tradition, Memphis was founded about bce by Meneswho supposedly united the two prehistoric kingdoms of Upper and Lower Egypt.

The life and times of ramses the great

Ramses II the Great reigned B. Third king of the 19th dynasty of Egypt, whose reign BC was the second longest in Egyptian history. In addition to his wars with the Hittites and Libyans, he is known for his extensive building programs and for the many colossal statues of him found all over Egypt.

Background and early years of reign. Seti achieved some success against the Hittites at first, but his gains were only temporary, for at the end of his reign the enemy was firmly established at Kadesh, on the Orontes River, a strong fortress defended by the river, which became the key to their southern frontier.

During his reign Seti gave the crown prince Ramses, the future Ramses II, a special status as regent. Seti provided him with a kingly household and harem, and the young prince accompanied his father on his campaigns, so that when he came to sole rule he had already had experience of kingship and of war.

Later history

It is noteworthy that Ramses was designated as successor at an unusually early age, as if to ensure that he would in fact succeed to the throne. He ranked as a captain of the army while still only 10 years old; at that age his rank must surely have been honorific, though he may well have been receiving military training.

Each of its four quarters had its own presiding deity: Amon in the west, Seth in the south, the royal cobra goddess, Buto Wadjetin the north, and, significantly, the Syrian goddess Astarte in the east.

A vogue for Asian deities had grown up in Egypt, and Ramses himself had distinct leanings in that direction. The first public act of Ramses after his accession to sole rule was to visit Thebes, the southern capital, for the great religious festival of Opet, when the god Amon of Karnak made a state visit in his ceremonial barge to the temple of Luxor.

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He also took the opportunity to appoint as the new high priest of Amon at Thebes a man named Nebwenenef, high priest of Anhur at nearby Thinis. In the fourth year of his reign, he led an army north to recover the lost provinces his father had been unable to conquer permanently.

The first expedition was to subdue rebellious local dynasts in southern Syria, to ensure a secure springboard for further advances. He halted at the Nahr al-Kalb near Beirut, where he set up an inscription to record the events of the campaign; today nothing remains of it except his name and the date; all the rest has weathered away.

The next year the main expedition set out. Its objective was the Hittite stronghold at Kadesh. Following the coastal road through Palestine and Lebanon, the army halted on reaching the south of the land of Amor, perhaps in the neighbourhood of Tripolis. Here Ramses detached a special task force, the duty of which seems to have been to secure the seaport of Simyra and thence to march up the valley of the Eleutherus River Nahr el-Kebir to rejoin the main army at Kadesh.

The main force then resumed its march to the River Orontes, the army being organized in four divisions of chariotry and infantry, each consisting of perhaps 5, men. Crossing the river from east to west at the ford of Shabtuna, about eight miles from Kadesh, the army passed through a wood to emerge on the plain in front of the city.

Two captured Hittite spies gave Ramses the false information that the main Hittite army was at Aleppo, some distance to the north, so that it appeared to the king as if he had only the garrison of Kadesh to deal with. It was not until the army had begun to arrive at the camping site before Kadesh that Ramses learned that the main Hittite army was in fact concealed behind the city.

Ramses at once sent off messengers to hasten the remainder of his forces, but before any further action could be taken, the Hittites struck with a force of 2, chariots, with three men to a chariot as against the Egyptian two.

The pharaoh - man, ruler and god

The leading Egyptian divisions, taken entirely by surprise, broke and fled in disorder, leaving Ramses and his small corps of household chariotry entirely surrounded by the enemy and fighting desperately.

Fortunately for the king, at the crisis of the battle, the Simyra task force appeared on the scene to make its junction with the main army and thus saved the situation.A: They will receive an email from The Great Courses notifying them of your eGift.

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Ramses II the Great (reigned B.C.) Third king of the 19th dynasty of Egypt, whose reign ( BC) was the second longest in Egyptian history.

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The life and times of ramses the great

The scars of childhood remain. SITE LAST UPDATED 6/8/ COMPREHENSIVE SITES Includes info on many different topics relating to Ancient Egypt Egypt Guide -- National Geographic - African Studies Center | Egypt Page Ancient Egypt — initiativeblog.com Articles, Video, Pictures and Facts.

Ramesses II / ˈ r æ m ə s iː z, ˈ r æ m s iː z, ˈ r æ m z iː z / (variously also spelt Rameses or Ramses (Ancient Egyptian: rꜥ-ms-sw "Ra is the one who bore him" > Koine Greek: Ῥαμέσσης, translit. Rhaméssēs); born c. BC; died July or August ; reigned –), also known as Ramesses the Great, was the third pharaoh of the Nineteenth Dynasty of Egypt.

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